4 Haunted Hikes Around DC

halloweenheader

October is a wonderful time to go hiking and witness the beauty of the changing season as well as creatures preparing for winter.

It’s also a time to celebrate Halloween by seeking out spooky wild places. Here are some wild lands where you may have a creature or two hiking with you – but not one that’s still living.

1. Gold Mine Trail, Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historic Park, Maryland

This haunted jaunt begins at Great Falls Tavern Visitor Center and passes by the site of an 1906 explosion that killed a miner. Afterwards, spirits known as “Tommy Knockers” began to haunt the mine. Two years later, a night watchman saw “a ghostie-looking man with eyes of fire and a tail 10 feet long” crawling out of the shaft, so the mine closed.

Say hi to “Tommy Knockers”, click here.

2. Appalachian Trail, Virginia

It was this time of year when four-year-old Ottie Powell vanished in 1891, while collecting firewood in a forest bright with colored leaves. His body was found five months later near Bluff Mountain, where a memorial for Ottie can still be found. Backpackers claim that those who spend a night at Punchbowl Shelter may encounter his spirit.

Pay Ottie a visit, click here.

3. Devil’s Den, Gettysburg National Battlefield, Pennsylvania

Gettysburg was the Civil War’s deadliest battle with over 50,000 corpses. Devil’s Den is a rocky out­crop­ping once used by snipers. Today it is notorious for causing cameras to malfunction, especially when used to try to capture Gettysburg’s phantoms. The most commonly sighted is the barefoot, rifle-carrying “Hippie,” who’s thought to be a former member of the 1st Texas Infantry. You’ll know him by his calling card: pointing toward Plum Rum and saying to visitors “What you’re looking for is over there.”

Have “Hippie” show you the way, click here.

4. Bloody Lane, Antietam National Battlefield, Maryland

The bloodiest one-day battle in American history happened in 1862 at Antietam. After only 12 hours, 23,000 soldiers were killed, wounded or missing. The road known as Bloody Lane is said to be haunted by some of these soldiers, evidenced by sounds of phantom gunfire, shouting and singing, as well as sightings of ghosts in Confederate uniform. Many fallen soldiers were buried under Burnside Bridge, visitors have heard phantom drumbeats and seen blue balls of light moving through the air.

The sights and sounds of Bloody Lane: click here.


Source: “13 Haunted Hikes”, The Wilderness Society

Dog-Friendly Hikes in the DC Area

Our nation’s capitol has no shortage of awesome hikes that are perfect to explore with your pooch. Whether hiking through the backcountry in surrounding cities or exploring historic trails through the city, DC treats doggies as valuable members of the family. Washington DC’s rich history and monumental landmarks aren’t the only things that doggies love about the capitol. Read below for the top 10 hikes to take your dog on in DC. And don’t forget to stop by any of our stores or shop online for some pet accessories!

Rock Creek Park
With over 32 miles of trails at Rock Creek Park, you and your pooch have wonderful hiking opportunities ahead! Rock Creek Park is a fantastic place for a walk, run or bike ride with your furry friend. The beautiful green landscape and endless trails through the woods make this hike impossible not to love.

3545 Williamsburg Ln NW Washington, DC, US 20008
Hours: Open during daylight hours
Website

Capital Crescent Trail
The Capital Crescent Trail is a beautiful trail that runs along the picturesque Potomac River. Pooches and their owners love walking, running or hiking the wide, paved trail that runs from Bethesda to Georgetown. From bikers and hikers to stroller pushers and dog walkers, everyone is welcome to enjoy the beautiful views from the Capital Crescent Trail.

3500 K St NW Washington, DC 20007
Hours: Sunrise to Sunset
Website

Theodore Roosevelt Island
The Theodore Roosevelt Island Hike is a perfect get-away for people and their pups from the hustle and bustle of downtown Washington, DC. The trail is surrounded by forests, parks, and waterfront views. Whether in the mood to take a leisurely stroll, run or hike with your doggy, Theodore Roosevelt Island is a great place to spend time with your pooch, observing all kinds of wildlife such as ducks, fish, frogs, turtle, cranes and bugs!

George Washington Pkwy Arlington, VA 22216
Hours: 6 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Website

Great Falls: Billy Goat Trail
If you’re looking for more than just a hike and want to embrace the true experience of mother nature, look no further than the Great Falls Billy Goat Trail. Not only will this hike push your body to the limits (especially your legs), but you’ll see some local residents on the trails too. From snakes to geese, be sure to keep a close eye on Fido during this beautiful hike.

Please note: Dogs are allowed on Trails B and C, but are not allowed on Trail A.

11710 Macarthur Blvd Potomac, MD 20854
Hours: Sunrise to Sunset
Website

Scott’s Run Nature Preserve
If you’re seeking a light walk for you and your canine, Scott’s Run Nature preserve is an easy way to enjoy the beautiful color of the season with a little bit of exercise. Scott’s Run Waterfall is situated right along the hiking trail and it’s a great place for your pooch to have a blast! Your pup will love playing in the swimming holes, cooling off during the summer and playing with other dogs. The trail leads to the Potomac River, a rewarding view for you and your pup after the hike.

7400 Georgetown Pike McLean, VA 22102
Hours: Dawn to Dusk
Website

Washington & Old Dominion Regional Park
Deemed the skinniest park in Virginia, The Washington and Old Dominican Regional Park is also one of the longest parks, with 45 miles of paved trails and 32 miles of gravel trail for hiking with Fido. If you’re feeling adventurous, the paved trails are great for rollerblading! With beautiful scenery in the urban heartland of the countryside of Northern Virginia, it’s hard not to love this hiking trail.

S Four Mile Run Dr and S Shirlington Rd Arlington, VA 22206
Hours: Dawn to Dusk
Website

Winkler Botanical Preserve
If you’re looking for a short but scenic hike with Fido, look no further than Winkler Botanical Preserve. The 1.4 mile loop is perfect for a morning stroll or an intense cardio workout! The property is complete with lush plants surrounding a small pond in the center of the park. The park also serves as a local resource for schools in the area to teach schoolchildren about ecology and the environment.

5400 Roanoke Ave Alexandria, VA 22311
Wesbite

Dyke Marsh
Dyke Marsh is a hidden gem located right near Washington DC The beautiful trail leads to a renovated boardwalk where you’ll see panoramic views of a beautiful bridge and the National Harbor. You and your pooch will love being surrounded by marsh and plenty of wildlife. Don’t be surprised to see a few beaver dams, ducks, migratory birds and bald eagles! Dyke Marsh is one of the most peaceful places you can be with your pup!

Boat Launch Rd Alexandria, VA 22307
Hours: Open year-round from 6 am to 10 pm.
Website

Kingman and Heritage Islands Park
Kingman and Heritage Islands Park is a long, narrow island in the Anacostia River. The park is complete with trails, trees and a diversity of birds and bugs. Locals, visitors and furry friends enjoy the bluegrass festival which is held here each year.

575 Oklahoma Ave NE (at N Benning Rd) Washington, DC 20002
Summer Hours: (April through October) Monday-Friday: 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM*, Saturday-Sunday: 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM*
Winter Hours (November through March) Monday-Friday: 9:00 AM – Dusk*, Saturday-Sunday: 9:00 AM – Dusk*
Website

Mount Vernon Trail
The Mount Vernon Trail is a multi-use trail that’s a great place to walk Fido in Washington DC! The trail is a truly unique way for you and your pup to see parts of DC/Alexandria/and Mount Vernon from a different vantage point. There are plenty of places to stop and stare at the beautiful scenery, including Dyke Marsh Wildlife Preserve. The trail itself is very well maintained which makes it an easier hike for you and your pup.

The Mount Vernon Trail parallels the parkway between Theodore Roosevelt Island and Mount Vernon.
Hours: Sunrise to Sunset
Website


 

Screen Shot 2014-09-03 at 12.16.02 PMNeed a new leash and collar before you take your pooch on that hike? Our Wolfgang selection features some of the coolest-looking designs we’ve seen. AND, all leash and collars are on sale at all our stores and online, click here to shop!


Source: Dogvacay.com

Mountain Biking 101

Looking to go off road for the first time? Here are tips and advice you need to make your introduction to mountain biking fun and successful.

  • The Basics: Mountain Bike Skills You Need to Know
    While only lots of riding, great fitness and endless bailouts into the bushes will make you the hottest rider on the block, here are some basic skills that every aspiring mountain biker should know.
  • 10 Ways to Improve Your Mountain Biking
    Whether you want to smoothly descend near-vertical downhill sections or just ride your local trails without crashing, these tips will having you rolling with confidence.

Think you’re ready to go? Come join us and Fuji Bikes this Sunday, August 24 at Schaeffer Farm Mountain Bike Park. Demo their latest mountain offering, ask all your questions and learn from our Outfitters and the Fuji demo staff. You not only get free Fuji swag, but you get to ride the trails!

FujiFFL

Click here to join us!


Articles from “Beginner’s Guide to Mountain Biking” on Active.com

 

Know Your Cycling Etiquette

Whether you’re a beginner or an expert cyclist, here are a few basic rules of the road:

Be Predictable

Nobody feels safe around the car that’s swerving, not using signals, and stopping suddenly. Ride as you would drive—as if you were trying to pass a driver’s-license test.

 

 

 

 

Stick to the Law

In most states, bikes are considered vehicles. When riding in the road, always signal, make complete stops at signs, and wait for red lights for your turn to ride through.

 

 

 

 

Ride to the Right

If there’s no shoulder on a two-way street, it’s always safer to stay a couple of feet out into the road. You’ll be visible and force cars behind you to move into the oncoming lane to pass you.

 

 

 

 

… Except When Turning Left

For this move, you’ll want to move from the right to the middle of the lane or merge into the left-turn lane if there is one. Check over your left shoulder for oncoming traffic and signal left before moving over.

 

 

 

 

Stay off Sidewalks

Lousy sight lines and people entering or exiting doorways and driveways make riding on sidewalks an accident waiting to happen. If you have to, and the city permits it, ride no faster than 6 to 8 mph—the speed most people jog.

 

 
Published in July 2014 issue of Bicycling magazine.

Keep Your Cool

8 Easy Tips

Summer’s here and with it comes a lack of outdoor runners. The summer sun and hot temps send people straight to the air-conditioned gym! But you may want to reconsider. Here are couple tips we’ve come across from July’s issue of Women’s Running Magazine, and thought we’d share the useful information:

When you run in hot temps, your body learns to use oxygen and muscle glycogen more efficiently while improving your ability to regulate body temperature. Training outdoors when the mercury rises doesn’t have to be a dreadful experience!

1. Acclimate gradually. “You can’t beat the heat, but you can slowly acclimate to it and manage it as best as possible,” says Nashville-based masters runner Sonja Freiend-Uhl. A typical heat acclimation protocol comprises 10 consecutive daily exposures of running in a hot environment. These runs should be performed at your easiest pace possible, with walk breaks whenever needed.

2. Be realistic. The sun and heat can take a lot out of you, even once you’re acclimated. Adjust your pace accordingly, and don’t beat yourself up for going slow. “You’re working just as hard or harder than you would be at a faster pace on cool day,” says Amy Marsh, a four-time Ironman champion who trains in Austin, Texas. Professional distance runner Amy Cole agrees: “Have confidence that you are building fitness and will be able to run faster in cooler temperatures.”

3. Set your alarm clock. If you want to battle the heat, you’ve got to beat the sun. Cole begins most of her summer runs before 5 a.m. Have an addiction to the snooze button? Read on…

4. Call in reinforcements. Find training partners who will tackle the temps with you! The buddy system offers great accountability–you’re less likely to skip a run if you know someone is counting on you to show up.

5. Strip down. Summer is no time for modesty. Sweaty clothes can cause chafing, add extra weight and prevent additional sweat from evaporating. “Wear as little clothing as possible,” says Marsh, “so long as it’s legal!” Or if you’re more modest, go for loose, breathable tops in light colors and accessorize with a visor to block the sun.

Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate!Check out HTO’s selection of Camelbak bottles to help you hydrate your runs

7. Map your run. Try to find shady places to avoid direct sunlight during your workout. If you haven’t tried trail running yet, summer is a great time to start. Forested areas can provide a respite from the brutal summer sun. Also, consider routes where you can refill your water bottles at public water fountains, gas stations or local run shops. You’ll be happy to have an oasis.

8. Chill, girl! “Don’t psych yourself out!” Cole stresses. “Prepare for the heat but don’t obsessively check the temperature before your run.” Don’t ignore your instincts either. If your gut is telling you it’s too hot, listen to it–and hit the gym instead.

How hot is too hot?


By Susan Lacke
July 2014, Women’s Running Magazine, pg 36-37